Baby Bottle Tooth Decay

Tooth decay children in infants and toddlers, also referred to as baby bottle tooth decay is one of the commonest health problems among children that can persist for a long time. Your child’s first teeth are essential, despite the fact that they are impermanent. This is because your baby needs strong, healthy teeth to chew properly, speak and smile. According to WebMD, premature loss of teeth could affect speech and may lead to the need for future speech therapy. Although other teeth may also be affected, baby bottle tooth decay often occurs in the upper front teeth.

It’s therefore, imperative that from the very beginning, you begin your child off with great oral care to secure their teeth for a considerable length of time. http://www.apollonia-dcc.com/ would be a great place to start.

 What causes baby bottle tooth decay?

Baby bottle decay occurs when sweetened liquids are left clinging to the child’s teeth for lengthy periods. The prolonged contact between the cariogenic bacteria in the mouth and the sugars in the drink on the teeth produces acid which attacks the teeth. Whenever you give your child these drinks, the acids attack the teeth 20 minutes longer. A repeat of this cycle is what causes tooth decay. Frequent bottle feeding at night and extended use of no-spilling up increase chances of tooth decay. It’s important to note that it’s not the content of the baby bottle that causes tooth decay; rather, it’s how often you expose your child to these drinks. Furthermore, allowing your baby to fall asleep with a bottle in their mouth as they take naps is a bad idea.

Prevention

The first step is to ensure that you’re wiping the gum with a clean piece of cloth even before they get their first tooth. You should also avoid filling the baby bottle with liquids such as juice, sugar water or soft drinks; only use the bottle for breast milk or formula. Also, avoid adding unnecessary sugars in your baby’s food and drinks.

Plan for the first dental visit to the pediatric dentist within six months after the first tooth erupts or right before your baby’s first birthday. Not only does this visit help prevent dental problems; it lays groundwork for future dental examinations.

As with most health issues, the earlier you address your child’s dental problems, the less invasive and extensive the treatment will be. And, the less expensive the visits to the dentist will be, so take charge early enough.